Vegetable Crop Rotation

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The same kind of crop cannot be grown successfully year after year on the same piece of land; it is, therefore, essential to grow different varieties in rotation to obtain the very best results. This is not only for avoiding attacks by insects, but to ensure that the second crop shall be properly nourished.

The following three general crop rotation rules will be found to work well in practice:

  • Plants of the same natural order should not succeed each other, such as a crop of Cauliflower after Cabbage, or Parsnip after Carrot.
  • Crops which occupy the same piece of ground for several years, such as Asparagus, should be succeeded by others of short duration, such as Cabbage or Lettuce.
  • Plants grown for their roots or bulbs, such as Beet and Onion, should not be succeeded by others grown for the same purpose; neither should plants grown for their seeds follow each other.

Although the above rules apply generally to all systems of rotation, it is not possible to recommend any particular method of cropping as the best, for the nature of the soil and the quantity and kind of manure available must also be taken into account. To the novice some examples of crops suitable for following each other either in the same season or in the succeeding one are appended.

Vegetable Crop Rotation Examples

BEANS may follow Borecole, Brocoli, Brussels  Sprouts, Cabbage, Parsnip, and Potatoes. Beans may be succeeded by any of the Cabbage tribe of plants, Celery, Leek, Lettuce and Turnip.

BEET may follow the Cabbage tribe, and any other crop, except Carrot, Parsnip, Salsify, Spinach, and Turnip. Beet may be succeeded by Beans, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Lettuce, or Peas, but not by Carrot, Parsnip, Spinach, and Turnip.

BORECOLE AND BRUSSELS SPROUTS may follow Beans, Lettuce, Peas, and Potatoes. Borecole and Brussels Sprouts may be succeeded by Broad and Dwarf Beans, Beet, Carrot, Onion, Parsnip, Peas, Potatoes or any other crop, but the Cabbage tribe and allied plants.

CABBAGE may follow Broad and Dwarf Beans, Lettuce, Onion, Peas and Potatoes, or any crop which is not allied to it. Cabbage may be succeeded by Broad and Dwarf Beans, Beet, Carrot, Celery, Lettuce, Parsnip, Peas, Potatoes, Salsify, Scorzonera, or any other crop but allied ones.

CARROT may follow any but Root Crops, Celery and Parsley and may be succeeded by any except Root Crops and allied ones.

CAULIFLOWER AND BROCOLI may follow Broad and Dwarf Beans, Beet, Carrot, Celery, Endive, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, Potatoes and Spinach. Cauliflower may be succeeded by any of the preceding crops.

CELERY when the ground is heavily manured for Celery, it may succeed any crop. Celery may be succeeded by Broad and Dwarf Beans, any of the Cabbage tribe of plants, Peas, Potatoes and Turnips.

LEEK may follow any crop except Shallot, Garlic, Onion, and that class of plants.

LETTUCE may follow Beans, the Cabbage tribe of plants, Peas, Potatoes, and any other crop, with the exception of Artichoke, Endive, Salsify or Scorzonera.

ONION AND SHALLOTS may follow Broad and Dwarf Beans, and any of the Cabbage tribe of plants, Celery, Peas, and Potatoes. Onion may be succeeded by any of the Cabbage tribe of plants.

PARSNIP may follow any crop but Carrot, Celery, Parsley, Beet, Potatoes, Salsify and Scorzonera. With these exceptions Parsnip may be succeeded by any crop.      ยท

PEAS may follow any of the Cabbage tribe of plants, Carrot, Parsnip, Potatoes, Spinach, and Turnip. Exceptions need only be made of Beans and other legumes. Peas may be succeeded by any of the Cabbage tribe of plants, Celery, Spinach and Turnip.

POTATOES may follow any crop except Beet, Carrot, Parsnip, Salsify and Scorzonera. Potatoes may be succeeded by almost any crop.

SEAKALE may follow Potatoes or almost any crop except the Cabbage tribe of plants. 8eakale may be succeeded by any plant except Silver Beet and the Cabbage tribe.

SPINACH may follow Broad and Dwarf Beans, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Peas and any other crop excepting Beet.

TURNIP AND SWEDE may follow Beans, Lettuce, Peas, Potatoes, Spinach, or any other crop except the Cabbage tribe of plants. Turnip may be succeeded by any crop but those of the Cabbage family.

If it is not possible, owing to the want of room, etc., to carry out the above rotations, or some slight modification with all crops, THOSE THAT ARE PUT IN MUST RECEIVE  LIBERAL TREATMENT. A gross-feeding crop exhausts the land of much fertility, and, if a similar or an allied crop has to succeed it, the ground must be heavily manured and deeply dug before the sowing or planting takes place; otherwise the resulting crop will be a poor one. The Cabbage family mentioned above includes Borecole, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Swede and Turnip.

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